Jan Paul Schutten


© Chris van Houts
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Frankfurter Buchmesse
Guest of Honour 2016
EN NL DE

Jan Paul Schutten

1970, Vlissingen
Author of non-fiction children’s books.

Schutten writes informative children’s books about all sorts of subjects from natural phenomena to history. His first children’s book was published in 2003: Ruik eens wat ik zeg, de taal van dieren en planten [Smell what I say, the language of animals and plants]. Every year since then he has published at least one book. In 2015 Schutten was appointed to be the children’s book ambassador for a period of two years. This is an initiative of The Dutch Reading Foundation and the Dutch Foundation for Literature. His main aim in this function is to promote informative books as a means of stimulating reading. Schutten has written more than 40 books, has received many awards in the Netherlands and Germany, and has been published in more than ten languages.

Links

  Translations   Jan Paul Schutten   Dutch foundation for literature   Gerstenberg   Gottmer

Recently translated into German

The Marvel of You
Gerstenberg Verlag, 2016
Translated by Verena Kiefer
Illustrations: Floor Rieder
Original title: Het wonder van jou en je biljoenen bewoners (Gottmer, 2015)



After the novel The Mystery of Life, which extensively explores evolution, there is now The Marvel of You, which examines the human body. It describes what a cell looks like on the inside: that a normal cell is even more spectacular than the Star Wars’ Death Star. It explains how to tell if someone is in love with you, why you get angry more quickly when it’s warm outside, and why chewing gum makes you smart. All of this – and much, much, more...

The Marvel of You contains an amazing amount of information and is written in the same humorous tone as the author’s first book. And of course this fun book also features the splendid illustrations of Golden Paintbrush winner Floor Rieder.
Schutten is an award-winning author who argues vehemently for evolution but doesn't exclude those who believe in God and creationism; he encourages his readers to think for themselves. Interspersed liberally throughout the text are clear, rather playful illustrations, which add to the lighthearted and humorous tone.

School Library Journal